Homeownership

2016 Was The Greatest Year Of My Life

The other day I told you about one of my biggest ragrets. Missed it? It's here.

Today, a week into the new year I wanted to recap 2016 for me.

I've seen so many people complaining about 2016 being the worst. And they can't wait for 2016 to be over.

From my perspective, to blame a year for something negates any positives that happened to you or by you. And to throw that much shade on a year, to not acknowledge the good, what you're proud of or grateful for, in my book... is setting yourself up to make next year even worse. You're going to get more of the same.

So in being some what hypocritical I'm going to say 2016 was the GREATEST YEAR OF MY ENTIRE LIFE.

Here's why:

1. I documented a HUGE CHECK of it. I made over 130 videos of our life and business. It makes memories easier to remember.

2. I dropped over 30 lbs. I went from 200ish to 167ish.

3. Because of #2, I sleep better and no longer have chronic shoulder injury.

4. In relation to my last email (the one below) I started running and ran my first 5K with Katherine on Thanksgiving day. She also started running this year. Neither of us were "runners" before this year.

In fact, when I committed to getting into shape in April/Mayish of this year, I could barely walk a mile at a brisk pace without getting shin-splits.

5. We paid off a mortgage and now own a property FREE & CLEAR. This is an incredible feeling. It was a huge goal. A huge accomplishment. And does so many things for us emotionally and financially.

I'd love to hear why 2016 was awesome for you. Contact me and let me know.

If however you hated 2016 and you can't find any good in it, don't bother emailing my back. Just put that up on Facebook. I think that's the appropriate place for it. ;)

Happy New Year! Darin Persinger

PS: By the way, you don't NEED to be negative or complain on Facebook. Look at my wall. You'd have to go back over 2 years probably to find anything negative.

The world doesn't need more negativity. And do you know the worst thing about posting or sharing something negative on Facebook?

It's permanent. It's like a tattoo. It's not just a thought or even something you said out loud.

That negativity is now documented and stays in the world forever.

“I think when I look out and I see there’s so much negativity in the world and a lot of people are unhappy and a lot people are anxious, it just feels like that’s one view of the world. But you don’t have to always focus on that view of the world.” 
— - Chris Hardwick

British Home vs American Homes

Politics in the USA is making some people on both the left and right threaten to leave if the other person gets elected. OK. Don't forget we can help you sell your house.

Also, things are a bit different in other countries. Just an FYI.

For example...

Wherever you may go around the world, it’s easy to conclude that if a home has four walls and a ceiling, everything else must be broadly the same. Well, even if that were true (and it’s not) there are still tiny differences between a house on the other side of the world and the house you normally live in that can be quite unsettling the first time you encounter them.

So, having conducted extensive research into American and British households (by comparing notes between the traveling experiences of Anglophenia writers) what are the things that are commonly recognizable to most British households that will come as a surprise to most American visitors?

To avoid getting stung by unexpected bills for gas and electricity, some British households use a system whereby they go to a local shop and have credit placed on an electronic tag called a PayPoint key. Just as a pay-as-you-go phone gives you a set amount of credit to make and receive calls, so the PayPoint key gives you a certain amount of gas, electricity or even water. This is just a modern update on the old system which relied upon putting coins in a meter.

Due to a healthy fear of electrocution, British bathrooms don’t tend to be wired up for electricity, as it does not play nicely with water. The noble exception to this rule is the two-pin electric shaver socket, which can either be wall-mounted or part of the light over a mirror. Some bathrooms don’t even have the light switch in the room: It’s out in the hall or landing, just by the door. It’s worth checking this before you find yourself feeling a wall in the middle of the night while busting for a pee.

This is worth getting right before you’re in too much of a hurry. Should you need to use the conveniences, ask for a bathroom and you may be directed to a room with a bath in it, but no toilet. The Brits are terribly literal like that. By all means, ask if you can use the toilet, or the lavatory, or the loo, and they will immediately direct you to the nearest room in which you can do your business.

Curated from 10 Things About a British Home That Will Confuse Americans | Anglophenia | BBC America